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Puffins that stay close to their partner during migration have more chicks

The new study which features in the April 7th 2017 edition of Marine Ecology Progress Series, focused on whether puffin pairs stayed in contact during the winter months or instead headed off and migrated independently, prioritising their individual health and wellbeing. The research also establishes whether this approach had any impact on the pairs’ subsequent breeding success.

Puffins that stay close to their partner during migration have more chicks

Puffin pairs that follow similar migration routes breed more successfully the following season, a new Oxford University study has found.

Peter Holland elected as 2017 Yen Kwo Yung Lecturer at CUHK

Linacre Professor of Zoology Peter Holland will travel to Hong Kong at Easter to give three lectures, following his recent election as the 2017 Yen Kwo Yung Lecturer at the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK).

One lecture, entitled 'The tree of life: an idea that changed the world', will be open to members of the public. The lecture is being held at the Hong Kong Science Museum on 8 April at 4:30pm.

Blood ties fuel cooperation among species, not survival instinct

Cooperative breeding; when adults in a group team up to care for offspring, is not a survival strategy for animals living in extreme environments. It is instead, a natural result of monogamous relationships reinforcing stronger genetic bonds in family groups. Siblings with full biological ties are more likely than others to stay with their family and help day to day, a new Oxford University study has found.

Read the article: http://www.ox.ac.uk/news/2017-02-22-blood-ties-fuel-cooperation-among-sp...