Dr. Cedric Tan Kai Wei

Dr. Cedric Tan Kai Wei

Cedric Tan Kai Wei

Details

Name: Dr. Cedric Tan Kai Wei
Position: Postdoctoral Researcher; Lecturer at Wadham College; Tutor at Department of Continuing Education.
Email: cedric.tan@zoo.ox.ac.uk

AUTOBIOGRAPHY

I completed my DPhil on the role of relatedness in the sexual dynamics of the red jungle fowl and the fruit fly. This three-year thesis at the University of Oxford was co-supervised by Dr. Tommaso Pizzari and Dr. Stuart Wigby.

Currently, I am a postdoctoral researcher and college lecturer at Wadham College teaching various topics on Biological Sciences. My passion for the arts drives my constant pursuit of novel and exciting ways of integrating science and arts both to teach and to disseminate research work to children and other non-scientists.

RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

My postdoctoral research examines an important but relatively unexplored mechanism of cryptic female choice: immune-mediated sperm selection. The female’s oviduct is an arena of sperm selection via local immunity, and strong immunoreactions may affect sperm survival in the oviduct, resulting in the decline in fertility. I am particularly interested in the proximate mechanism of this anti-sperm immune response and what determines whether a female responds immunologically to the sperm of a particular male, e.g. male-female relatedness.

My upcoming position at Wildlife Conservation Research Unit involves that use of innovative methods from games to role play to teach, conduct research and do outreach on conservation issues.

OUTREACH AND EDUCATION

Winner of Dance you PhD 2013 by Sciencehttp://news.sciencemag.org/scientific-community/2013/11/dance-your-ph.d.-and-winner-%E2%80%A6

Winner of Evolution 2012 Video Contest by NESCent (National Evolution Synthesis Center): https://vimeo.com/44808911

Winner of Dance your PhD 2012 (Biology category) by Science: http://vimeo.com/30211782

Collaborative dance project on red jungle fowl: http://vimeo.com/14602697

Interview on the BBC World Service (its at about 44 mins) http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01m366z

Report in NY Times  http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/01/science/female-fruit-flies-like-one-mate-or-his-brother.html?_r=0

Interview on BBC Radio Oxford Sept.2013 http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01gc3fp (it’s at 1:45 of the link.)

Shortlisted nominee for the ‘Innovation in Teaching’ award by Oxford University Student Union.

Winner of the ‘Use of technology for outreach and impact’ prize given during the Oxford Teaching and Learning Enhanced by New Technology (OxTALENT) 2012 awards ceremony.

SELECTED RECENT PAPERS

Carazo P*, Tan CKW*, Allen Felicity, Wigby S & Pizzari T (2013) Within-group male relatedness reduces harm to females in Drosophila. Nature http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v505/n7485/full/nature12949.html

* Joint first author

Tan CKW, Hanne L, Greenway E, Goodwin S, Pizzari T & Wigby S  (2013) Sex-specific responses to ‘direct’ and ‘phenotypic’ sexual familiarity, and the role of olfaction in Drosophila. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/280/1771/20131691.full

Tan CKW, Pizzari T & Wigby S (2013) Parental age, gametic age, and inbreeding interact to modulate offspring viability in Drosophila melanogaster. Evolution. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/evo.12131/abstract

Tan CKW, Hanne L, Greenway E, Goodwin S, Pizzari T & Wigby S  (2013) Sex-specific responses to ‘direct’ and ‘phenotypic’ sexual familiarity, and the role of olfaction in Drosophila. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/280/1771/20131691.full

Tan CKW & Corlett RT (2011) Scavenging of dead invertebrates along an urbanization gradient in Singapore. Insect Conservation and Diversity 5: 138-145. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1752-4598.2011.00143.x/abstract

Tan CKW (2009) Effects of trenching on shell size and density of intertidal shells, Turbo brunneus (gastropoda: turbinidae) and Monodonta labio (gastropoda: trochidae) at Labrador shore, Singapore. Nature in Singapore. 2: 421-429